Letter from the Editors: Summer 2019 Edition

School is out, but the Grappler’s in. Sorry. We just like writing a bit too much. There are way too many things that we want to grapple with–so, no–we are not taking a summer break. We are in the midst of planning for next year. In conversation with TTS’s season, The Grappler will focus on... Continue Reading →

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The Workshop Podcast

May 14, 2019 To kick off this year's Wright's of Spring, Jake Pinckes, a 4th year Theatre Arts major has teamed up with the Grappler to record several podcast interviews. The name of this podcast, The Workshop, is a play on this year's theme, "Santa's Workshop," and is also a tribute to the process of writing play via... Continue Reading →

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The Takedown: The Problem with Movie-Musicals

By Emma Demski, Staff Writer May 10, 2019 Completely original shows on Broadway are rather rare. However, the recent tidal wave of movie-musicals hitting Broadway feels excessive, even though it was inevitable. Movie-musicals have proven time and time again to be very successful. They make money, and in short investors are more willing to put... Continue Reading →

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Letter From The Editors

The Grappler is back from summer vacation and ready to write! First and foremost, The Grappler says goodbye to our co- Editor in Chief Trisha Mahoney as she embarks on a year in Germany. We welcome Jordan Scott Hardesty to the position. The Grappler looks forward to two more years with Jordan as Editor in... Continue Reading →

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The Aristophanesathon: A Cheeky, Feminist Feast as Means of Refuge in Our Turbulent Times

By Mariah Schultz Talking turtles, horny Athenians, and kiddy daiquiris are just a few of the delights in store if you dare to sit through the four hours of The Hypocrites’ The Aristophanesathon. That’s right, folks, you read that correctly. Four hours of Aristophanes’ eleven surviving comedies including two twenty minute intermissions. But rest assured,... Continue Reading →

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The Art of Satire, and Those Who Fail to Make It

by Mariah Schultz and Aidan Senn There is a fine line between satire and humor. The two can often coalesce, but humor is merely a byproduct of satire, not the sole function. At its heart, satire is meant to critique a clear truth in an exaggerated and often  absurd (and humorous) extent. It requires precise... Continue Reading →

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Fleabag: The Anti-Rom Com

by Maddy Mason Ryan Gosling holds Rachel McAdams up in the pouring rain. Leo and Kate look longingly off to the side as their giant faces flank the RMS Titanic. Jennifer Garner skips in front of an outline of New York city, wearing a little slip and trenchcoat. The Rom-Com ranks pretty low for me... Continue Reading →

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We Need a Comedy of Humanity

by Jordan Scott Hardesty The United States deserves a good laugh. We’ve been wrapped up in news articles, disingenuous speeches, suffering, and chaos for well over a year and honestly, it’s taking a toll on our mental health. A couple of years ago, we wouldn’t willingly look to argue with strangers on the internet over... Continue Reading →

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Who IS the Big Bad Wolf?

by Trisha Mahoney I watch a lot of television. And a lot of superhero films. They are a wonderful escape from the reality of my daily grind of navigating difficult and nuanced socially conscious conversations. I love my job as a dramaturg, but those conversations are easier to have when it is black and white.... Continue Reading →

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Laura Biagi’s S.A.D Self Love

by Emma Durbin When I am single on Valentines Day, do I feel failure because I am lonely, or is it because I’ve been told that my relationship status determines my value as a human being? And what if I chose to be alone and ignore “Galentine's” Day? Does my decision to not be with... Continue Reading →

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Survival Lessons From The Simpsons

by Maddy Mason As I write this, it is the first day of tech for Mr. Burns: A Post-Electric Play. The room is divided in two: people either run around on the stage adjusting a set piece, or they sit around and try to pass the time until their cue is called. I am sitting... Continue Reading →

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Letter From the Editors

Hello, wonderful Grapplerites! We here at The Grappler are excited for the promise of what 2018 has to bring, and hope that you are excited about the potential change that could be brought about within this new year. Part of the ability to change or to encourage change is to start with looking at how... Continue Reading →

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The Oldest Profession

by Maddy Mason My theatrical career began in the ensemble. I played the pivotal role of Bystander #1 in Les Miserables, screaming “Look out!” as I ran down the dark aisles of the 24th Street Theater. Without this crucial line said by Bystander #1, we would not have the emotional stakes of the Runaway Cart... Continue Reading →

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Not Just A Simple Show

by Maddy Mason I mean this statement with all sincerity: Spongebob Squarepants the Musical might be one of the best modern musicals written. Bold statement, considering all the shows written within the past twenty years. But, after seeing this show when it was in Chicago, I felt like I was witnessing a blockbuster in the... Continue Reading →

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Take it or Leave it, But at Least Consider It!

Article and Graphic by Natalia Janusz As each of us navigates our careers, we tend to pick up wisdom from older people who have been in the business for decades. Different lighting designers, technicians, programmers, and crew chiefs have been the older voice in my life as I work my way through the lighting industry.... Continue Reading →

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Why is White Always Right?

by Bri Schwarz, Editor-in-Chief You see: Shakespeare. Strindberg. Ibsen. Miller I see: White. White. White. Male. White. White. White.  Whitewhitewhitewhitewhite. When I began my freshman year at DePaul, I was told these were the everymen of theatre. These were gods that I was not allowed to question because they originated the theatre we know today.... Continue Reading →

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The Danger of Disbelief

by Rebecca Galkin, Part Time Staff Writer Due to rocky relations between Cuba and the United States and recent changes with U.S security from the Trump administration, Ludi Teatro, a Cuban theatre company, is canceling their production of The Mirror. This play was slotted as the opening production for Destinos, the first Chicago International Latino... Continue Reading →

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Any Clue to Terminal Hip?

by Trisha Mahoney Graphic by Bri Schwartz In over the 200 plays that I have read in my 21-year-old life, there has only been one that I have vehemently hated. Guess what? Terminal Hip is that play. I have been avoiding this for years. Reading Mac Wellman’s Terminal Hip is experiencing the death of everything... Continue Reading →

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Letter from the Editors

Hello my fellow Grapplers, We are incredibly honored and excited to be serving as your two Editors-in-Chief for the 2017-2018. The Grappler is an incredible organization with members dedicated to our mission of grappling with current events in theatre and beyond. In our current socio-political sphere, what more could a student organization could ask for?... Continue Reading →

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High School, Our Town, and a Purple Carnation

by Trisha Mahoney, Editor-in-Chief Graphic by Danielle B. Szabo I was a Freshman in high school when I met my theatre mentor. He changed my life, completely altered its course. And then he died during my Senior year. As a nervous, red-faced and pigtail-haired 14-year-old, I stumbled into his classroom. I handed off my crinkled... Continue Reading →

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Bad and Nasty = Bust

By Bri Schwartz, Event Coordinator Graphic by Klaire Brezinski “Real artists are always waiting for a revolution. When that day comes, they will be the ones who speak for the masses.” When a 14 year old Bri heard this come out of her theatre teacher’s mouth, she was inspired. She made it her goal to do... Continue Reading →

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Listening to Hear

By Yasmin Mitchel, Associate Editor Graphic by Danielle B. Szabo I hear the cane before anything else, the soft, confident thwack against the door. Pulling the door open with the cane's crooked head, she wobbles into the classroom locking eyes with me. She is bundled in a long, worn coat, a couple buttons missing —... Continue Reading →

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Spring Quarter Letters from the Editors

Dear Grapplerites, Here at The Grappler, we have always been invested in taking a deeper look at the world around us. We firmly believe that what has happened historically or what is happening now does not need to stay that way. This is why we read, write, and most importantly, discuss. In order to make... Continue Reading →

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The Re-Whiting of American History

By Rachel Perzynski, Associate Editor Graphic by Klaire Brezinski If you needed more evidence as to how our nation continues to undermine the struggles and triumphs of black Americans, you would only have to pick up a U.S. History textbook at your local library. While looking for resources on antebellum slavery for The Theatre School’s... Continue Reading →

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Presenting Histories Past, Present, and Future

By Lauren Quinlan, Chief Critic Graphic by Danielle B. Szabo Teching a show is a grueling process. As a dramaturg, I am not always sure what my role is in that process. I am not always seeing a full product, so I struggle with how to evaluate it effectively. In the downtime between fine-tuning scenes... Continue Reading →

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In Defense of Dr. Rachel Shteir: A Grappler Editorial

By the Grappler Editorial Board Graphic by Jose Mogollon Here are the facts: Rachel Shteir wrote this critical piece on the Shakespeare 400 festival that occurred in Chicago during all of 2016. Artists took the streets, or rather… the social media platforms, to complain and rage about Dr. Shteir once again. See her 2013 piece... Continue Reading →

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A Question of Equine Consent

By Emily L. Witt, Staff Writer Graphic by Emily L. Witt Great theatre should cause its audience to question their own morality and tolerance. Hampton Cade’s recent lab For Want of a Horse by Olivia Dufalt did just that. Those of us that identify as liberals like to think we’re so satisfyingly open-minded to the... Continue Reading →

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Student Politics

By Kelly Garcia, Part-Time Staff Writer Graphic by Klaire Brezinski On January 5, 2017, the Student Government Association at DePaul University met for an annual constitutional review session, behind closed doors, to propose some controversial amendments. One of the amendments proposed denying students who are not in SGA’s general body from running for President or... Continue Reading →

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Creating a ‘Shindig’

By Hannah Kaplan, Part-Time Staff Writer Graphic by Daniella Ashley Mazzio “Okay, everyone find a seat and quiet down, we’re going to get started!” I yell, scouting from the performance area to see how many people are here. How did my apartment fill up so fast? It feels like just a second ago that I... Continue Reading →

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